Army Corps Of Engineers Gives November Update On Missouri River

(KCCR) — Officials with the U-S Army Corps of Engineers gave an update on the Missouri River Thursday. Scott Doomer with the Missouri River Forecast Center in Kansas City says October was an active month for precipitation in the Missouri River basin…

“Significant rainfall has occurred over northern Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, south central North Dakota and Missouri. Some of the locations have received in excess of 300% of normal precipitation for this period. Many locations have actually received in excess of 4 inches of precipitation with as much as 8 inches in Missouri in the past month.”
Doomer says a mountain snowpack is already forming in the upper Missouri River basin. Kevin Stom with the Corps Missouri River Water Management Division says above normal runoff continued in October…

“As a result of well above average late summer and fall precipitation, primarily in September. By reservoir reach October runoff was over six times the average runoff in the Oahe reach; over three times the average runoff in the Gavins Point reach and almost 10 times the average runoff in the Gavins Point to Sioux City reach due to flooding on the James, Vermillion and Big Sioux Rivers. This resulted in record high October runoff in the upper Missouri River basin.”
November runoff is expected to be two times the average runoff in the Missouri River basin. Mike Swenson also with the Corps Missouri River Water Management Division says the Corps is continuing to push as much water out of the reservoir system as they can…

“Fort Randall reservoir is at elevation 1345-point-eight, down two-point-four feet since the end of October. Releases from Fort Randall are currently 76,000 c-f-s and are expected to remain near that rate over next week. Oahe reservoir is at elevation 1612-point-five; down point four since the end of October. The reservoir is five feet above the base of the annual flood control zone. Releases from Oahe are currently about 65,000 c-f-s and are expected to remain at that rate during November.”
Runoff into the Oahe reservoir in October was over six times the normal average.