Army Corps Of Engineers Say 2019 Runoff Second Highest In 120 Years Of Record Keeping

(KCCR) — The U-S Army Corps of Engineers is continuing to provide weekly updates on the status of the Missouri River as the river and its tributaries remain at or over flood stage in many locations below Gavins Point Dam. Hydrologist Kevin Lowe with the National Weather Service says rain chances remain unchanged for at least then next week…

“It looks fairly good.  It’s kind of more of the same. Scattered showers and thunderstorms possible over the next 7 days, but as it stands right now the cumulative area averages should be an inch or less.”
Lowe says they are watching a tropical system that, depending on its track, could affect the lower Missouri River Basin. John Remus, Chief of Missouri River Basin Water Management for Corps says 2019 runoff will be one of the highest ever…

“The July 1st forecast for runoff in the basin above Sioux City, Iowa is 49.9 million acre-feet.  This is slightly lower than our June 1st forecast of 59 million acre-feet.   It realize this runoff will be the second-largest runoff in the 120 year record.  Reservoir system storage is currently 68.4-million acre-feet  This is just above the base of the system’s exclusive flood control zone.  12.3 million acre-feet of the 16.3 million acre-feet of total flood control storage is currently occupied. System storage is expected to peak within a week or so as the reservoirs continue to capture the last of the runoff from the melting mountains snow pack.”
Remus says Gavins Point releases will continue at 70-thousand cubic-feet-per-second for the next week. Fort Randall reservoir is eight feet higher than normal for summer use…

“Big Bend releases are currently 51-thousand cubic-feet-per-second and releases from Big Bend will range from 43-thousand to 53-thousand cubic-feet-per-second as we move forward.  Oahe Reservoir is at elevation 1616.7 and is declining  after a small rise do to localize rainfall runoff over the last few days.  The reservoir 9.2 feet above the base of the annual flood control zone.  Releases from Oahe are currently about 55-thousand cubic-feet-per-second and will range from 54 to 55-thousand cubic-feet-per-second over the next week or so.”
Officials with the Corps say the weekly Thursday afternoon update will continue at least through August.